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World Music

World Music
NFQ Level 8 major Award Honours Bachelor Degree NFQ Level 8

Entry Route: Bachelor of Arts in Performing Arts - LM026

CAO points history:
303 †
Course code:
LM026
Duration:
4 Years

† Indicates that students admitted to the programme are required to undergo a Garda Vetting process.
Course leader:
Mel Mercier
Email: Tel:
+353 61 202918
Admissions:
Tel: 00 353 61 202015
Queries: www.ul.ie/admissions-askus

A Global View of Music

The BA World Music is a four-year, full-time undergraduate programme, open to students from all music backgrounds who wish to take a global view of music. Students taking this pathway study diverse music traditions from around the world, including the court music of Indonesia, popular musics of West Africa, classical musics of India, folk and Celtic musics of Europe, classical music of the Arab Middle East, and traditional musics of Canada and America.

The first year of the course is the common entry programme shared with all the pathways (Irish Music, Irish Dance, Contemporary Dance, Voice and World Music).  However you focus from the start of this first year is on your own performance practice and you will begin to learn to perform a range of world music styles, including Javanese gamelan, West African drumming and Indian classical music, and explore the histories and cultural contexts of these diverse global music practices. In addition, students taking the World Music pathway have the opportunity to develop their performance skills on their first instrument (including voice) and to deepen their academic knowledge of their ‘own’ music, be it traditional, popular or classical music.

World Class Teaching Staff and Facilities

The World Music pathway is taught by the Academy’s team of internationally renowned performers and scholars. Students also attend workshops, concerts and seminars presented by Irish and international visiting artists and academics. Lectures, ensemble classes, workshops, lessons and concerts take place in the Irish World Academy’s state-of-the-art studios, rehearsal rooms and performance spaces, and students have access to the Academy’s outstanding collection of world music instruments and cutting-edge music technology.Students taking the World Music pathway also share several core course modules with other students on the BA Performing Arts, including music theory, ethnomusicology, performance studies, ethnochoreology, and a range of vocational modules designed to prepare students for future careers.

 

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What you will study

New Artistic and Academic Horizons

In addition to their core modules, each year students choose from a large number of elective modules in dance and music, and other subjects outside of the performing arts. These elective modules offer students the opportunity to enhance their educational experience, and broaden their artistic and academic horizons. Elective options include a wide range of vocal and instrumental ensembles (from Academy choir to Irish traditional music ensemble), songwriting classes, lectures in country music, courses in choreography, North American percussive dance, Irish folklore and history, and various languages, including Irish.

Cooperative Education – Work Experience

In their 3rd year, Irish World Academy performing arts students go on ‘co-op’, a university-wide module specifically designed for undergraduates to engage in real-world, professional environments.   The Cooperative Education division, in consultation with the Academy, helps students to identify working opportunities in a variety of contexts, including arts management, education, performance, media and related fields.  Students are encouraged to set up their own six-month placements or to engage in split placements (ideally no more than two placements) in order to explore if their expectations for future careers match the experiences they have during the co-op period.  Faculty visits, pre- and post- co-op assessment skills, and final report help students to reflect upon the process, enabling them to critically evaluate their time off campus.

Year 1

In Practicum A students receive individual instrumental/vocal lessons, perform in the Javanese gamelan ensemble and study the theory of several world music genres.

 

Instrumental/vocal lessons

  • World Music students take lessons on their primary/first instrument and a world music instrument. Lessons on the primary/first instrument are intended to support the development of each student’s existing instrumental/vocal practice. Lessons are taught by approved teachers and take place at the Irish World Academy.
  • World Music students also take lessons on a new, world music instrument. These lessons are intended to support the development of new instrumental/vocal practices, giving students an opportunity to learn to play a new instrument and a new repertoire of music. Lessons are taught by approved teachers and take place at the Irish World Academy. Instrumental tuition is offered on several instruments including Indian Sarode, West African Djembe and a range of Javanese gamelan instruments.

Javanese Gamelan Ensemble

  • Students take weekly ensemble performance classes in Javanese Gamelan, learning to play the Academy’s recently acquired set of Indonesian instruments – an orchestra of 40-60 tuned bronze gongs, metallophones and drums.

World Music Theory

  • Students taking the World Music pathway take their own Theory stream, which focuses on developing their understanding of the music traditions and practices that they study in their ensemble classes and individual lessons.

Practicum C is an ensemble, performance module, which provides students with the opportunity to participate in a wide range of music and dance practical learning. World Music students take two compulsory ensemble classes (for example: West African Mandinka Drumming Ensemble and Middle Eastern and Balkan Music Ensemble) and also choose two performance classes from the range of options offered by all BA Performing Arts pathways (for example: Gospel Choir, Irish Traditional Music Ensemble and Flamenco).

The Critical Encounters module consists of four lecture courses. All lectures are taken by 1st year BA Performing Arts students. 

Critical Encounters with Irish Music and Dance 

  • In this class students are introduced to Irish traditional music and dance studies. Students deepen their knowledge of traditional repertoires and performance practices and develop their scholarly engagement with Irish traditional music and dance. Students engage with a range of research approaches drawn from various scholarly disciplines, including ethnomusicology and ethnochoreology.

Critical Encounters with World Music and Dance 

  • In this class students are introduced to diverse music traditions from around the world, including, popular musics of West Africa, the court music of Indonesia, classical musics of India, folk and Celtic musics of Europe, classical music of the Arab Middle East, and traditional musics of Canada and America. Students deepen their knowledge of diverse repertoires and performance practices, develop their scholarly engagement with music and dance, gain a more global view of music and dance, and contextualise their own music and dance practices within the wider world of music and dance.

Critical Encounters with Western Art Music and Dance 

  • In this class students study a range of western art music and contemporary dance repertoires and practices. Students deepen their knowledge of diverse repertoires and performance practices and are introduced to the scholarly disciplines of musicology, dance studies and arts practice.

Critical Encounters with Popular Music and Dance

  • In this class students study various genres of popular music and dance. Students deepen their knowledge of diverse popular repertoires and performance practices, and deepen their knowledge of the role of popular culture in social, political, economic, cultural and artistic life. Students develop a critical view of popular music and dance, and contextualize their own music and dance practices within the wider, commercially mediated world of music and dance.

In addition to their core modules, each year students choose from a large number of elective modules in dance and music, and other subjects outside of the performing arts. These elective modules offer students the opportunity to enhance their educational experience, and broaden their artistic and academic horizons. Elective options vary from year to year but typically students can choose from  range of vocal and instrumental ensembles (from Academy choir to Irish traditional music ensemble), songwriting classes, lectures in country music, courses in choreography, North American percussive dance, Irish folklore and history, and various languages, including Irish.

Year 2

In Practicum A students receive individual instrumental/vocal lessons, perform in the Javanese gamelan ensemble and study the theory of several world music genres.

 

Instrumental/vocal lessons

  • World Music students take lessons on their primary/first instrument and a world music instrument. Lessons on the primary/first instrument are intended to support the development of each student’s existing instrumental/vocal practice. Lessons are taught by approved teachers and take place at the Irish World Academy.
  • World Music students also take lessons on a new, world music instrument. These lessons are intended to support the development of new instrumental/vocal practices, giving students an opportunity to learn to play a new instrument and a new repertoire of music. Lessons are taught by approved teachers and take place at the Irish World Academy. Instrumental tuition is offered on several instruments including Indian Sarode, West African Djembe and a range of Javanese gamelan instruments.

Javanese Gamelan Ensemble

  • Students take weekly ensemble performance classes in Javanese Gamelan, learning to play the Academy’s recently acquired set of Indonesian instruments – an orchestra of 40-60 tuned bronze gongs, metallophones and drums.

World Music Theory

  • Students taking the World Music pathway take their own Theory stream, which focuses on developing their understanding of the music traditions and practices that they study in their ensemble classes and individual lessons.

Practicum C is an ensemble performance module. It provides students with the opportunity to participate in a wide range of practical music and dance learning. World Music students take two compulsory ensemble classes (for example: West African Mandinka Drumming Ensemble and Middle Eastern and Balkan Music Ensemble) and also choose two performance classes from the range of options offered by all BA Performing Arts pathways (for example: Gospel Choir, Irish Traditional Music Ensemble and Flamenco).

This module introduces students to aspects of sound and movement from around the world, questioning the nature of ‘World Music and Dance’ in the 21st century digital age.

This module introduces students to professional audio and visual technologies relevant to performers in their field. Students learn to use audio and visual  technologies in professional contexts: recording concerts, providing technical support to a wide range of performances and generating media appropriate to the world of performing arts.

This module introduces students to a variety of popular musics from around the world. Students will explore aspects of the history, performance practice and repertoire of selected popular musics.

In addition to their core modules, each year students choose from a large number of elective modules in dance and music, and other subjects outside of the performing arts. These elective modules offer students the opportunity to enhance their educational experience, and broaden their artistic and academic horizons. Elective options vary from year to year but typically students can choose from  range of vocal and instrumental ensembles (from Academy choir to Irish traditional music ensemble), songwriting classes, lectures in country music, courses in choreography, North American percussive dance, Irish folklore and history, and various languages, including Irish.

Year 3

In the first semester of year 3, students go on ‘co-op’placement, a university-wide module designed to engage students in real-world, professional learning experiences. UL’s Cooperative Education division, in consultation with the Academy, helps students to identify opportunities in a variety of contexts, including arts management, education, performance, media and related areas.

In Practicum A students receive individual instrumental/vocal lessons, perform in the Javanese gamelan ensemble and study the theory of several world music genres.

 

Instrumental/vocal lessons

  • World Music students take lessons on their primary/first instrument and a world music instrument. Lessons on the primary/first instrument are intended to support the development of each student’s existing instrumental/vocal practice. Lessons are taught by approved teachers and take place at the Irish World Academy.
  • World Music students also take lessons on a new, world music instrument. These lessons are intended to support the development of new instrumental/vocal practices, giving students an opportunity to learn to play a new instrument and a new repertoire of music. Lessons are taught by approved teachers and take place at the Irish World Academy. Instrumental tuition is offered on several instruments including Indian Sarode, West African Djembe and a range of Javanese gamelan instruments.

Javanese Gamelan Ensemble

  • Students take weekly ensemble performance classes in Javanese Gamelan, learning to play the Academy’s recently acquired set of Indonesian instruments – an orchestra of 40-60 tuned bronze gongs, metallophones and drums.

World Music Theory

  • Students taking the World Music pathway take their own Theory stream, which focuses on developing their understanding of the music traditions and practices that they study in their ensemble classes and individual lessons.

Practicum C is an ensemble performance module. It provides students with the opportunity to participate in a wide range of practical music and dance learning. World Music students take two compulsory ensemble classes (for example: West African Mandinka Drumming Ensemble and Middle Eastern and Balkan Music Ensemble) and also choose two performance classes from the range of options offered by all BA Performing Arts pathways (for example: Gospel Choir, Irish Traditional Music Ensemble and Flamenco).

This module introduces students to the disciplines of ethnomusicology, ethnochoreology and arts practice. Students engage with relevant principles, concepts and methodologies.

This module develops students awareness and understanding of the impact of the arts on health and well-being. Students study the role of the arts in various settings, including hospitals, community settings and mental health settings. The role of the arts in society, more generally, is also considered.

In addition to their core modules, each year students choose from a large number of elective modules in dance and music, and other subjects outside of the performing arts. These elective modules offer students the opportunity to enhance their educational experience, and broaden their artistic and academic horizons. Elective options vary from year to year but typically students can choose from  range of vocal and instrumental ensembles (from Academy choir to Irish traditional music ensemble), songwriting classes, lectures in country music, courses in choreography, North American percussive dance, Irish folklore and history, and various languages, including Irish.

Year 4

In Practicum A students receive individual instrumental/vocal lessons, perform in the Javanese gamelan ensemble and study the theory of several world music genres.

 

Instrumental/vocal lessons

  • World Music students take lessons on their primary/first instrument and a world music instrument. Lessons on the primary/first instrument are intended to support the development of each student’s existing instrumental/vocal practice. Lessons are taught by approved teachers and take place at the Irish World Academy.
  • World Music students also take lessons on a new, world music instrument. These lessons are intended to support the development of new instrumental/vocal practices, giving students an opportunity to learn to play a new instrument and a new repertoire of music. Lessons are taught by approved teachers and take place at the Irish World Academy. Instrumental tuition is offered on several instruments including Indian Sarode, West African Djembe and a range of Javanese gamelan instruments.

Javanese Gamelan Ensemble

  • Students take weekly ensemble performance classes in Javanese Gamelan, learning to play the Academy’s recently acquired set of Indonesian instruments – an orchestra of 40-60 tuned bronze gongs, metallophones and drums.

World Music Theory

  • Students taking the World Music pathway take their own Theory stream, which focuses on developing their understanding of the music traditions and practices that they study in their ensemble classes and individual lessons.

 

Practicum C is an ensemble performance module. It provides students with the opportunity to participate in a wide range of practical music and dance learning. World Music students take two compulsory ensemble classes (for example: West African Mandinka Drumming Ensemble and Middle Eastern and Balkan Music Ensemble) and also choose two performance classes from the range of options offered by all BA Performing Arts pathways (for example: Gospel Choir, Irish Traditional Music Ensemble and Flamenco).

This module is intended students in the first semester of their fourth year, preparing to embark on an extended research project which will be presented in a 10,000 word thesis or equivalent. The student will agree on the subject of the project with the course director and will be introduced to a number of sample research projects and methodologies.

This module will examine issues pertinent to the lives of professional musicians and dancers. Issues such as promotion, effective communication, industry structures, touring, dealing with statutory arts bodies and funding structures will be practically engaged. Classes may feature professionals working in these fields and regularly faculty with relevant experience. This aspect of the module is supported by a lecture series and assessed through attendance and written assignments in the form of professional portfolios and resources.

This is the second of the two Irish World Academy modules for the FYP. The student works in a one on one context with supervisor in this module while receiving certain skills training to enable them to fill out the structure of the FYP started in the previous semester. Students will produce their own unique piece of research in an genre and disciplinary approach to the performing arts of their own choosing.

This module is designed to give advanced undergraduate students the opportunity to explore a particular topic in an in-depth way not possible in introductory or survey modules. Specific topics will be chosen by the faculty member coordinating the module and will generally be research based. It is intended to serve as a recruitment stepping stone taking 4th year undergraduates into considering post-graduate studies in the international field of ethnomusicology.

In addition to their core modules, each year students choose from a large number of elective modules in dance and music, and other subjects outside of the performing arts. These elective modules offer students the opportunity to enhance their educational experience, and broaden their artistic and academic horizons. Elective options vary from year to year but typically students can choose from  range of vocal and instrumental ensembles (from Academy choir to Irish traditional music ensemble), songwriting classes, lectures in country music, courses in choreography, North American percussive dance, Irish folklore and history, and various languages, including Irish.

Entry requirements

Please refer to the course entry route, Bachelor of Arts in Performing Arts, for a full list of entry requirements. 

How to apply

Where are you applying from? How to Apply
Ireland Irish students must apply to UL via the CAO. More information can be found here. 
The UK  Students who have completed their A-Levels can apply to UL via the CAO. More information can be found on the Academic Registry website. 
The EU EU Students can apply to UL via the CAO. More information can be found on the Academic Registry website.
Non-EU country If you are outside of the EU, you can apply for this degree here.

 

Fees & funding

Student course fees are broken into three components - Student contribution, Student Centre Levy and Tuition Fees.

A number of illustrative examples of fees for this course based on the current fee levels have been set out in the tables below.

An explanation of the components, how to determine status and the criteria involved is provided below the examples as is a list of possible scholarships and funding available.

EU Students with Free fees status in receipt of a SUSI grant

HEA paysTuition Fees€2,558
SUSI paysStudent contribution€3,000
Student paysStudent Centre Levy€92
€5,650

EU Students with Free fees status not in receipt of a grant

HEA paysTuition Fees€2,558
Student paysStudent contribution€3,000
Student paysStudent Centre Levy€92
€5,650

Students with EU fee status not in receipt of a grant

Student paysTuition Fees€2,558
Student paysStudent contribution€3,000
Student paysStudent Centre Levy€92
€5,650

Non-EU Students

Student paysTuition Fees€12,178
Student paysStudent Centre Levy€92
€12,270

Student course fees are comprised of three components:

Student Contribution

Annual charge set by the government for all full-time third level students. All students are liable unless they have been approved for a grant by Student Universal Support Ireland (SUSI). Please refer to https://www.studentfinance.ie to determine your eligibility for a grant and for instructions on how to apply. The curent student contribution is set at €3000.

Student Centre Levy

All students are liable to pay the Student Centre Levy of €90. Please note the Student Centre Levy is not covered by the SUSI Grant.

Tuition Fees

These are based on Residency, Citizenship, Course requirements.

Review the three groups of criteria to determine your fee status as follows

  1. Residency
    • You must have been living in an EU/EEA member state or Switzerland for at least 3 of the 5 years before starting your course
  2. Citizenship
    • You must be a citizen of an EU/EEA member state or Switzerland or have official refugee status
  3. Course Requirements (all must be met)
    • You must be a first time full-time undergraduate (Exceptions are provided for students who hold a Level 6 or Level 7 qualification and are progressing to a Level 8 course in the same general area of study).
    • You must be undertaking a full-time undergraduate course of at least 2 year’s duration
    • You cannot be undertaking a repeat year of study at the same level unless evidence of exceptional circumstances eg serious illness is provided (in which case this condition may be waived)

Depending on how you meet these criteria your status will be one of the following -

More information about fees can be found on the Finance website

 

Your future career

  • Professional Performance
  • Further Study (MA, PhD)
  • Music/Dance Therapy
  • Community Music/Dance
  • Music/Dance teacher
  • Arts administration
  • Performance management and promotion
  • Backstage work in performance theatre e.g. sound engineer
  • Music Technology, e.g. recording studio producer/technician
  • Media (TV, Radio etc.)
  • Work in cultural institutions and archives

To find out more, go to https://www.IrishWorldAcademy.ie

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