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Prof Stephen Kinsella

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Stephen Kinsella is an Irish economist. He is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Limerick's Kemmy Business School in Ireland, a columnist with Ireland's Sunday Business Post, and has appeared before the Oireachtas committees on four occasions, most recently the Committee on the Future of the Health Service, September 14th, 2016, discussing health workforce planning models in the context of the nascent Sláintecare strategy. Stephen's research uses national accounting data to make better models, and he applies this to health systems research. Among Stephen’s health-related research, is an evidence review on “Health Workforce Planning Models, Tools and Processes in Five Countries”, which was published by the Health Research Board in 2016. Stephen current advises 2 PhD students in health policy research and is a fellow of UL’s Health Research Institute.

Publications

Raza H, Zoega G, Kinsella S. Capital inflows, crisis and recovery in small open economies. Finance Research Letters. 2018. DOI: 10.1016/j.frl.2018.03.011. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.frl.2018.03.011.

Ahern E, Kinsella S, Semkovska M. Clinical efficacy and economic evaluation of online cognitive behavioral therapy for major depressive disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Taylor & Francis (2017). doi:10.6084/m9.figshare.5649337. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5649337

Alessandro C, Godin A, Caverzasi E, Gallegati M, Kinsella S, Stiglitz JE. Corrigendum to “Agent based-stock flow consistent macroeconomics: Towards a benchmark model”. Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, 69 (2016) 375–408. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jedc.2017.06.006

Kinsella S, NicGhabhann N. Designing policy: collaborative policy development within the context of the European capital of culture bid process. Cultural Trends, 26:3 (2017) 233-248. https://doi.org/10.1080/09548963.2017.1342997

Fasianos A, Raza H, Kinsella S. Exploring the link between household debt and income inequality: an asymmetric approach. Applied Economics Letters, 24:6 (2017) 404-409. https://doi.org/10.1080/13504851.2016.1197360