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Cracking the code for continuous processing and personalised medicine

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Researchers Involved:

Summary of the Impact:

Personalised medicine is the next great global challenge for the pharmaceutical industry. The vision of the pharmacy of the future is one in which  pharmacies employ disruptive technologies to enable on-demand manufacture of drugs designed to individual needs. For example, multiple medications may be prescribed that treat a patient’s exact age-profile and medical history. These medications could then be 3D printed into one tablet, on-demand at the patient’s local drug supplier.

Giving a voice to victims in the Irish criminal process

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Researchers Involved:

Summary of the Impact:

Many of us will become a victim of crime at some point in our lives, yet many victims chose not to report these crimes to the police. Ultimately, a large number of victims in Ireland are not engaging in the criminal justice system.

Nutrition supports for age related muscle mass loss

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Summary of the Impact:

In Ireland, only 30% of women and 45% of men over 65 remain disability-free for life (O'Regan et al 2014). Dramatic changes in cells start in our 30s, while in our 40s, health and functionality are impacted by increasing weight gain, decreasing bone density and loss or weakening of muscle. People with low lean tissue or muscle mass are classified as sarcopenic. Conservative estimates predict that the incidence of sarcopenia will increase by 50% over the next 30 years, making it a major public health issue among Ireland’s increasing older population.

Improving the quality of life for people living with MS

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Researchers Involved:

Summary of the Impact:

Twenty years ago people living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) were advised to “take it easy”. Today, there is a growing body of evidence showing that exercise is beneficial for a number of key symptoms like walking and fatigue. The MS research team at University of Limerick is making significant contributions to this U-turn and the team’s research has had direct positive impacts on the health of thousands of people, and on clinical practice and national programmes of care.