New University of Limerick-led PhD in Foundations of Data Science launched

Minister for Higher Education Mary Mitchell O’Connor, seated, with Dr Ruth Freeman, SFI, Prof James Gleeson, UL and Director of CRT Foundations of Data Science, CEO Skillnet Paul Healy, Assoc Prof Claire Gormley, UCD, Co-Director of CRT, and Prof Ken Duffy, Maynooth University, Co-Director of CRT Picture: Andres Poveda

A new doctoral training programme in data science led by University of Limerick and a number of key industry partners has been launched.

Mathematical models could help to brew the perfect cup of coffee

Few of the billions of coffee drinkers around the world would ever consider the science behind the drink.

But researchers at University of Limerick have shown that mathematical models could help to brew the perfect cup of coffee.

Dr Kevin Moroney, a postdoctoral researcher in UL’s Department of Mathematics and Statistics (MACSI) and Synthesis and Solid State Pharmaceutical Centre (SSPC) at Bernal in UL, and his colleague, Dr Ken O’Connell, a postdoctoral researcher in the DPTC research centre at Bernal in UL, working with industry partners, have just published research in a prominent international journal that looks at the maths behind brewing coffee.

29% of STEM undergraduates do not know what jobs to apply for

Minister Mitchell O’Connor welcomes Johnson & Johnson’s Announcement of Expanded WiSTEM2D programme to UCC along with UL
New research conducted among undergraduates in Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) at the University of Limerick (UL) has revealed that almost one third are not aware of the types of jobs they could apply for once they graduate.

This research has been conducted as Johnson and Johnson, the global healthcare company, enters the third year of its WiSTEM2D programme in collaboration with UL. The findings highlight some of the central challenges in attracting more females into STEM-related careers.

The maths behind a perfect cup of coffee

The process behind your favourite hot drink involves growing the beans, harvesting, drying, roasting, grinding, brewing - and maths

Brewing the perfect cup of coffee has long been considered an art, depending on experience and skills honed by baristas and amateur enthusiasts alike over generations. However, each of the processes though which coffee is realised - such as growing the beans, harvesting, drying, roasting, grinding and brewing - are fundamentally science-driven applications. Even the most mature processes can benefit from a scientific approach, grounded in the language of mathematics.

Phos"Fate": Where have all the nutrients gone?

Jordan Phosphate Mines

Phosphate is a limited resource vital for global agriculture. Dr Iain Moyles and Dr John Donohue from MACSI discuss their work funded by Science Foundation Ireland on mathematical modelling of nutrient flow in soil. During the podcast Iain and John describe the phosphate crisis which acknowledges that phosphorus is a limited resource and only a few countries have significant reserves of it including Morocco, China, Algeria and Syria.

 

Putting Maths to Work

Mathematicians from all over the world, from New Zealand to Mongolia, gathered in Limerick to solve problems faced by Irish Industries at the 128th European Study Group with Industry. Over 5 days about 100 mathematical scientists worked on a wide variety of problems presented by Irish companies, from modelling what happens to a car during a crash in order to tackle insurance fraud to how microwaves measure water content in the raw material that produces alumina.

MACSI and ESRI research shows that electricity users, not investors, are exposed to price fluctuations

A study by Mel Devine and Niall Farrell of the Economic and Social Research Institute and William T Lee of the universities of Portsmouth and Limerick, says the system means that electricity users, rather than those investing in renewable energy, are the ones exposed to price fluctuations.

The system means that renewable energy producers are compensated when the wholesale price of electricity falls below the tariff guaranteed to them under the Refit scheme.

Homes and businesses pay for this through the public service charge, which increases as the wholesale price falls, while those who invest in renewable power face no risk from movements in the wholesale price.

Lero and Fraunhofer Centre focus on digital transformation projects

L-R Mikael Lindvall,Peter O’Neill,Brian Fitzgerald,Taoiseach Enda Kenny,Mark Ferguson,Adam Porter,Mike Hinchey,Brendan O’Malley

Washington D.C., Monday, 20th March, 2017

An Taoiseach Enda Kenny TD has announced the signing of a new agreement between Lero, the UL headquartered SFI Research Centre for Software, and the Fraunhofer Center for Experimental Software Engineering at the University of Maryland, which will see both centres of excellence engage in extensive research collaboration in the coming years. The collaboration will focus on evolving critical systems and digital transformation.

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