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Reading Lists

Reading Lists made easy!

Reading Lists Online give students access to course readings via Sulis or Moodle, including recommended books, articles, videos, podcasts and webpages. 

Lecturers, tutors and administrators can quickly and easily create and update reading lists, and students can comment, collaborate and create their own collections.

Reading List information is automatically sent to the Library who ensure that collections match lists, and who purchase recommended materials where required.

READING LISTS FOR STAFF - login

 

Introduction

Reading Lists Online is an interactive, student facing reading list system that allows academics to build lists for students and to manage, edit and update them in one place.

Your reading lists have been integrated with Sulis and Moodle course pages, presenting relevant course materials directly in Sulis and Moodle and allowing students to click straight to the Library catalogue record, journal article or e-book.  Reading Lists Online enables the Library to quickly and easily check lists to make sure that items are available for students.

How to access Reading Lists Online

Follow the tutorials provided or contact the library for any queries.

Reading Lists Online Terminology 

ExLibris Leganto  – Reading List Online software.

Citation  – Refers to item e.g. book, journal, article, etc.

ICLA - Irish Copyright Licensing Authority

Permalink - A Permalink gives you the option to share your reading list with guests.

Tags:

To place a purchase or a digitisation request choose 'Add tags to item', and select the appropriate tag. Notes can be added by opening the item record, scrolling down, and clicking 'Send a note to librarian'. In general, you don’t need to worry about the number of copies or what format they will be in as the reading list team will work that out for you.

Section Headings:

Core Text – essential to the course, all students will need to use this text.

Other Relevant Text – supplementary text, students are encouraged to use these texts.

Books are purchased in accordance with the Library's and individual departments' Collection Development and Managment Policies. Unless otherwise indicated by a departmental policy, the Library will buy multiple copies of 'Core Texts', and single copies of 'Other Relevant Texts'. We will contact the course leader regarding whether or not other texts should be purchased - e.g. background reading.

 

Getting Started - How To Create A Reading List

Create A Reading List

You can easily add items to your reading list for students, or build your own personal reading list called 'My Collection'.  At a later stage, you may copy, or drag-and-drop from 'My Collection' list to the student's 'Reading List'.

01 Log In from your VLE and Create a Reading List Page

This tutorial will demonstrate logging in to Leganto from the Learning Management System (LMS), Brightspace, but in your case, you can access via Sulis or Moodle, or the link below. The tutorial instructs on how to begin creating a reading list page for your course, and how to insert sections e.g. semesters, weeks, etc. 

02 Log In from Leganto and Create a Reading List Page

This tutorial starts by accessing the 'Leganto' url, but in your case, you may go directly to Sulis or Moodle and select ‘Reading Lists’ from the menu, or you may go to the link below. The tutorial will then demonstrate how to find materials, add them as citations to your Reading List, deliver them to your students, and communicate with library staff and students alike.

 

If you need help with your reading lists please send us your query via  Ask Us/Tell Us or email at readinglists@ul.ie and include the name of your course/module.

Adding/Editing Reading Lists

03 Add/Delete items via Read Lists Search

Search for titles in the library catalogue to add to your course's reading list.

04 Add items via Upload

Upload your own documents (such as PDF files, etc.) and add them to your reading list with an option of adding a note to your students.

05 Add items from Web via 'Cite It!' Widget

Install 'Cite It!' to easily add webpages or online articles to your 'Reading List' or 'My Collection'.

06 Add items via RIS File import

Import a Research Information System (RIS) file, to add to your reading list.  You can import either directly into the list, or into the 'My Collection' section, from where the item can be added to any of your reading lists.  You can also export the items of a given list into the RIS format.

07 Add items directly from a Citation Manager

Your can easily add items to your reading list from your citation manager, such as RefWorks or Zotero.

08 Viewing and Editing Reading Lists / Sending Requests and Notes to Library or Students

View and edit the details of your reading list items.  You can place requests (such as digitization, multiple copies, etc.) to library staff regarding an item, write public notes for students, add a due date for reading them, etc.

Sending Your List to the Library and Publishing it for Students

09 Send Reading Lists to the Library for Processing

Once you've finished compiling a reading list, send it to the library staff for processing, including handling of any requests you may have placed on items.

10 Publish Reading Lists for Students / Create a Permalink / Follow a Reading List

Publish your Reading List Online to make it available for students. A Permalink gives you the option to share your reading list with guests. You can also follow reading lists published by others for "all students".  (How to create a Permalink begins at 1:30 ; Follow A Reading List begins at 1:56 in this tutorial).

11 Managing Collaborators for a Reading List

Add your colleagues and fellow instructors as reading list collaborators, allowing them to add and annotate citations. You can also add them as owners to your list, allowing them to manage collaborators as well.

12 Student Interaction with Reading Lists

Leganto encourages social interaction regarding the course reading. Students can like items, post comments in the discussion thread, mark items as read, etc. As the reading list owner, you can moderate discussions. Students can update their profile including importing Facebook profile details. Users can also change their accessibility settings, updating font size, contrast mode, etc. to improve visiblity.

13 Notifications

Leganto's notifications section alerts you to changes made to your reading list.

How to Get Something Digitised For Your Students or Add Notes to an Item

08 Viewing and Editing Reading LIsts / Requests and Notes to the Library or Students

View and edit the details of your reading list items You can place requests (such as digitisation, multiple copies, etc.) to library staff regarding an item, write public notes for students, add a due date for reading them, etc.

If you wish to digitise an item for your students and you are already using Reading Lists Online, you do not need to do anything.  Library Services will create digital copies of items on your reading list where this is the best way to deliver them to students.

Library Services can only digitise items within the limits of Copyright law and licences and, as the Library provides many e-journals and e-books, we will normally only digitise items that are not already available in an electronic format.

We recommend that you submit your reading lists as soon as they are ready, and a minimum of 2-3 weeks ahead of the course start date, to give us time to digitise items for your students.

If you are not using Reading Lists Online, please refer to the tutorial links provided or send us your query via Ask Us/Tell Us including the name of your course/module, or contact your Faculty Librarian.

 

Adding Collaborators to a Reading List

11 Manage Reading List Collaborators

Add your colleagues and fellow instructors as reading list collaborators, allowing them to add and edit citations.  You can also add them as owners to your list, allowing them to manage collaborators as well.

 

Interaction With Your Students

12 Students Interaction In A Reading List

Reading Lists Online encourages social interaction regarding the course reading.  Students can 'like' items, post comments in the discussion thread, mark items as read, etc.  As the reading list owner, you can moderate discussions.  Students can update their profile including importing Facebook profile details.  Users can also cange their accessibility settings, updating font size, contrast mode, etc. to improve visibility.

 

Receiving Notifications of Changes to your Reading Lists

13 Notifications

Reading lists notifications alerts you to changes made to your reading list.

 

Create Additional Reading Lists

14 Create Additional Reading Lists 

There are several ways to create new reading lists : manually; by importing a reading list file; and by duplicating an existing list.

Frequently Asked Questions

Please refer to our Guide to Copyright LibGuide for information.

My students can't see a digitised item - who do I tell?

If your students are having difficulty accessing digitised content on your reading list please notify Ask Us/Tell Us , or contact your Faculty Librarian.

If you contact Ask Us/Tell Us, please include the name of the course in your message, as this will make it quicker for us to locate your list and fix the problem.

 

What is the best way to link students to online content?

As a general rule it is OK to link to online content from a reading list or VLE (Sulis or Moodle).

Library materials

Each item you find when using Library Search has a permalink.  To view it, select Actions and Permalink.

Journal articles

You can turn a DOI (Digital Object Identifier ) into a link by adding the prefix http://dx.doi.org/ to the DOI displayed on a journal article (e.g. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0138495).

Websites

Copy the address (URL) displayed by your browser.

Help

If you find you are having trouble linking your students to a library resource, please send us your query via

 Ask Us | Tell Us including the name of your course/module, or contact your Faculty Librarian.

How can I quickly find an image to use in my slides?

If you do a Google search you will get a large number of images, some which will be protected by copyright, some that belong to stock photography agencies, some licensed under a Creative Commons licence, and others offered for free.

Checking the licence of each photograph takes a lot of time so it is quicker to search sources that you know have images licensed under a Creative Commons licence or provide images free of charge.

Remember to acknowledge the photographer and image library where this is requested.

Some site suggestions:

Creative Commons Search (searches Google, Flickr and Pixabay)

Freeimages (search free images, not Getty istock)

Flickr (search, then use advanced filters to see only Creative  Commons images)

MorgueFile (free photos, avoid stock images)

Pexels (Creative Commons Zero (CC0) licence)

Unsplash – (Creative Commons Zero (CC0) licence)

What can I include in an exam paper?

Please refer to our Guide to Copyright LibGuide  for information. 

Copyright is not infringed by anything done for the purposes of an examination, by way of setting questions, communicating questions to the candidates or answering questions.  The preparation of theses may be included as being under preparation for examination however the exemption would not cover subsequent publishing of the thesis.  Reprographic copying of a musical work for use by an examination candidate in performing the work is not allowed.

Copyright applies to all categories of works, irrespective of format.  This includes newer formats such as computer programmes, databases and websites.  It should not be assumed that because material is freely available on the web, copyright laws do not apply.  Putting others' images or articles that are still in copyright into a VLE or intranet without their explicit permission is copyright infringement because you are indirectly providing multiple copies.  However there are some options available to you.

If you want to reproduce a whole journal article for an exam, pick a journal stocked by the Library and Ask Us/Tell Us if there is permission within UL’s Copyright Licensing to make multiple print copies available to students.

 If you choose materials from the internet then you can only use an extract from an online news article or blog post unless the website’s terms of use clearly say otherwise.

What can I include in my lecture recording (Panopto)?

Copyright

Nowadays it is very easy to create an interesting presentation, use pictures from the web, a sound file from another website and perhaps some video to add another dimension to the presentation.

But do we give due consideration to copyright? Do we have permission to use this material? It may not be such a big problem for those lectures that are limited to our own students. Please refer to our Guide to Copyright LibGuide for information.

After the Recording

After a lecture/presentation is recorded, the material is uploaded to a server where editing is possible and the end product is stored. The Panopto system provides a highly managed distribution and viewing system for recorded material, many options are available. For example, it is possible to restrict who may view the recorded material. It is also possible to convert to a number of different formats: mp4 video podcast, mp3 audio-only podcast etc. The options can be managed and restricted to suit the needs of clients.

How can I stop students posting my lecture on YouTube?

While you can’t technically stop students uploading your lecture to YouTube, you can add a statement to all your teaching materials that makes it clear to students what they can and can’t do with them.

Example:

This presentation has been added to Sulis to support your studies.

You may print and/or download a single copy for your personal, educational use.

Further redistribution, including emailing copies to others or making copies available on the internet, is not permitted.

How do I ask a copyright holder for permission?

Please refer to our Guide to Copyright LibGuide for information.

You should request permission from a copyright holder when neither law nor licence permit you to use a copyrighted work in the way you’d like to.

For books and journal articles the copyright holder is normally the publisher but check the copyrighted statement. For material on websites, the copyright holder may be the individual creator or owner of the website.

Once you have identified the copyright holder write to them providing the following details:

  • the work you want to copy
  • a link to the work (if on the web)
  • your intended use (purpose, format and location)
  • the amount / pages you want to copy
  • number of students on the course (if applicable)

Only use the copyrighted materials if you receive a positive reply and always keep on file any correspondence as proof of permission.

What should I do if I receive an infringement notice?

If you receive an infringement notice, take it seriously and don’t ignore it.

  1. Acknowledge receipt of their letter, or email, and confirm that you will look into the matter.
  2. Make no comment on whether you believe your use of their work is legitimate or not.
  3. Ask the complainant for more information if this would help.
  4. Take any action that will placate the complainant and stop the situation getting worse. For example, if the complaint is about making content available online, temporarily remove it.

Once you have all the relevant information decide if you think you have infringed the complainant’s rights and reply to them. If you aren’t sure send us your query to Ask Us/Tell Us or refer to our Guide to Copyright LibGuide for information. Follow any advice you receive.

How much of printed UL thesis may I copy?

Please refer to the guidance within the thesis for permission to copy.  Theses may not be copied without the express permission of the author.

Where a thesis has no copyright notice, you should treat it in the same way as other library materials and copy only an amount that the author would think fair. As working guidance, we suggest you limit your copying to a single copy of one chapter or multiple extracts that add up to a similar amount. The purpose of your copying must always be non-commercial research or private study, and the copy should be kept personal, so not shared with others or placed on the internet.

How do I cite and reference the images in my slides?

Cite and reference images in your slides in the same way that you would cite them in a paper, making sure to link to the original source if it is online.

On the slide, show the citation, copyright holder and/or licence information displayed on the original source, then add a reference slide at the end of your presentation. Where it is impractical to display the citation on the slide, add the slide numbers to the reference slide at the end of your presentation.

What is a Creative Commons licence?

Creative Commons licences are a series of licences written in everyday language that allow content creators, such as photographers and writers, to clearly tell others what they can and can’t do with it.

Creative Commons came up with the idea of creating 6 licences that all allowed a work to be copied and shared but varied when it came to the things that people cared about most: commercial use, making derivatives and keeping works open.  

Creative Commons licences are useful to lecturers because they provide permission to re-use whole works, especially images.  When citing an image or other work licensed with a Creative Commons licence, always add a link to the licence and the original work, see Best practices for attribution.

Use in university teaching materials is normally viewed as non-commercial use as your primary purpose is to educate students, not to make money. CC Search helps you locate images, music and videos licensed with a Creative Commons licence.

 

Contact the Library

Please get in touch with us directly if you have any questions or comments.