Research in AHSS

Research in the School of Culture and Communication

Research in the School of Culture and Communication

The School of Culture and Communication houses four subjects:
 
  • Irish Language and Literature
  • English
  • Journalism
  • Technical Communication and Instructional Design. 
 
Research in Léann na Gaeilge [Irish Language and Literature] in the School covers a wide range of themes in language, literature and society from the Early Modern period until the present, with strong specialisations in 18th-19th century and in the contemporary period. The variety of research in the field reflects the richness and depth of scholarship in the Irish and international contexts. Faculty have particular expertise in the social and ethnographic aspects of the language, expressed in leading research on literary and musical creativity and performance, folklore and oral literature, sociolinguistics and the societal questions around the ideologies and linguistic practices of the language and its speakers. The study of thought, modernism, late-modernism and the way that authors and performers express these global influences through the lens of Irish language and culture are at the root of our research, as are the study of the many genres in story-telling in all its forms. Language policy and planning are among our core concerns and represent the applied nature of research on contemporary language and society in the Gaeltacht, Ireland and the wider world. The social and practical questions of teaching and learning the Irish language are key areas of our research agenda.
 
Yeats conferenceResearchers in English are an active and diverse community of scholar/teachers, focusing on Irish, US, and anglophone world literature and cultural studies, along with creative writing. We specialise in topics that include the late medieval/early modern transition from manuscript to print culture, eighteenth-century poetry and Gothic literature, the fin de siècle, literary modernisms, the occult and spectrality, ageing, the body, African and postcolonial writing, gender studies, graphic novels and comics, and contemporary literature and critical theory. We work with colleagues in other disciplines at UL on topics such as early modern culture and societyemotions in society, gerontology, gender studieslandscape, and performance. We participate in scholarly networks from Boston to Hong Kong to Brazil to Sweden. We house the Eighteenth-Century Research Group and are one of two universities sponsoring the International Yeats Society. Our programme in creative writing supports writers in residence, a visiting writer series, and a new summer school at New York University, as well as publishing the acclaimed literary magazine The Ogham Stone.
 
Journalism at UL. One of the Journalism at UL’s core strengths is its industry links and professional practice orientation. As such, much research focus is oriented toward the examination of journalism practice itself. The increasingly important societal role of journalism and mass media is also significant. In our increasingly mediated society journalism’s role in cultural, economic and political process is of critical importance, particularly in times of uncertainty and crisis. This is reflected in the department’s research into the representation of class, economics, gender and ethnicities in the media.
 
Our research tends to coalesce under the following broad topics:
•        How journalism activity is affected by economic, political and socio-cultural forces and how journalism in turn can influence those processes.
•        What factors which influence journalism practitioners at societal, organisational and individual levels.
•        How new technological developments influence the practice of journalism and how these innovations can be incorporated usefully into a teaching setting
•        How all of these forces impact the product of journalism work, namely news
 
We are interested in developing new methodological approaches which can be used to examine the outcome of journalism work and track the various factors that affect this process across print and broadcast mediums.
 
Faculty in Technical Communication and Instructional Design (TCID) work in a number of related disciplines, including technical communication, instructional design, and e-learning.  Faculty are actively researching and supervising a large number of research projects in several areas, including virtual teamwork, open education resources, best practice in online teaching, mobile learning, educational ICT policy-making, web communication heuristics, plain English, and assessment design.  Faculty in TCID collaborate with internal colleagues in several faculties as well as with international colleagues from the US and Europe.  TCID researchers are also active members of various research networks (e.g. COST and the EU-funded TechCommFrame project) and are affiliated with other organisations including the Localisation Research Centre and the Association for Learning Technology. Our MA programme in Technical Communication and E-learning is available online and on-campus, and is the largest postgraduate programme in the AHSS faculty.
 
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