Centre for Early Modern Studies, Limerick Research Seminar Series Autumn 2020

06 October 2020


20th October 2020, 4 p.m.

Professor Alison Forrestal (NUIG)

A Spiritual Inheritance? Family Spirit, Virtue and Vocation in the Lives of the Lamoignon Dévots

Register online: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/centre-for-early-modern-studies-limerick-res...

 

17th November 2020, 4 p.m.

Dr Annaleigh Margey (DKIT)

Making Sense of Early Modern Maps of Ireland

Register online: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/centre-for-early-modern-studies-limerick-res...

8th December 2020, 4 p.m.

Dr Gordon Ó Riain (UL)

Learning Literary Language in Late Medieval and Early Modern Ireland

Register online: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/centre-for-early-modern-studies-limerick-res...

Abstracts:

Prof. Alison Forrestal (NUIG) A Spiritual Inheritance?

Family Spirit, Virtue and Vocation in the Lives of the Lamoignon Dévots Scholars of the Catholic Reform movement in seventeenth-century France have long puzzled over the different paths that individuals and families took within it. They now tend to agree that a Leaguer, politique or royalist past was no guarantee that survivors of the Wars of Religion or their familial successors would choose a particular strand of religious sympathy, devotion and activity. At the same time, they agree that the different religious-spiritual affinities that developed within individual families over several generations were hugely important for the longer-term endurance of the dévots and for religious culture in France generally. But exactly how and why particular families made those choices remains an under-researched area. My paper will investigate the robe Lamoignon family, which, although one of the most prominent dévot families of the century, has been subjected to little scholarly scrutiny. It will focus on three generations of Lamoignon, six individuals in total, all active from the 1620s to the 1690s, thereby examining the different ways in which individual members engaged with dévot activism during the rise and subsidence of the Reform movement. It will also assess the family as a whole, concentrating on the ways in which devotional affiliations, activities, and kin appraisals of such fed into the creation of family memory and identity over time. For both areas, I plan mainly to draw from the Lamoignon family papers - a revealing selection of wills, correspondence, and six unpublished vies written by siblings and offspring.

Dr Annaleigh Margey (DKIT) Making Sense of Early Modern Maps of Ireland

In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, maps of Ireland and its regions, became a much sought-after commodity. These maps reflected England, and later Britain’s, changing relationship with Ireland, moving from purely reconnaissance, to defence, to plantation and to estate mapping, as subjugation gave rise to full-scale settlement in the Irish midlands, Munster and Ulster. Increased interaction with the country by English statesmen, in particular, gave rise to an increase in requests for, and commissions of, maps, the result of which is the over 650 surviving manuscript maps of Ireland. This paper will introduce the breadth of this collection. It will focus specifically on how, in recent centuries, historians, geographers, archaeologists and other specialists have attempted to make sense of the collection through research and cataloguing. It will then move to explore why, for whom and, by whom, many of these maps were being commissioned and produced. In particular, this will examine the public and private commissioning of maps by statespeople such as Sir William Cecil, Lord Burghley and Sir George Carew, and new landowners, such as Sir Matthew de Renzi and Sir James Hamilton.

Dr Gordon Ó Riain (UL) Learning Literary Language in Late Medieval and Early Modern Ireland

There are a number of extant Early Modern Irish texts which were used to train poets in the correct use of language and metre. This paper will provide an overview of these grammatical and metrical tracts and will survey the evidence they provide for learning the literary register of Early Modern Irish (1200-1650). This paper will also focus on the transmission of selected tracts and what this can reveal about the nature of