Science of the Very Fast and the Very Small at Core of NanoNet Conference 2015 in UL

Sean Chitedze and Ola Olatilewa, Thomond Primary School, Limerick with Maryam Karimijafari, MSSI, UL

The vital importance of nanotechnology is being celebrated during NanoWeek in Ireland this week with the flagship event, the NanoNet Conference 2015 taking place at the University of Limerick on Wednesday 21st and Thursday 22nd October.

UL Academic named as UN International Biodiversity Expert

Dr Ken Byrne, UN Intergovernmental Science‐Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES

Dr Ken Byrne, Department of Life Sciences at the University of Limerick has been nominated as an International Expert, for the UN Intergovernmental Science‐Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES).  Dr Byrne will be a Lead Author for the thematic assessment on land degradation and restoration. This commenced at a meeting in Switzerland this August and is due for completion in 2017. He will work as part of a team of international experts to conduct regional/subregional assessments on biodiversity and ecosystem services for Europe and Central Asia.

Drive-through diagnostics

Research from the University of Limerick has unlocked a major scientific challenge which has exciting potential for point of care medical tests. The research entitled ‘Nanoelectrical analysis of single molecules and atomic-scale materials at the solid/liquid interface’ is reported online in Nature Materials.

Pharmaceutical research and collaboration

Meet Dr Anthony Maher - UL BSc Industrial Biochemistry Graduate, researcher and Kerry Senior Footballer. One of UL's many PhD graduates striving for excellence and making a real impact to our knowledge economy. 94% of  our PhD graduates are employed, with the majority working in Ireland and helping to build our world-leading innovation ecosystem.

Applying sensor technology to the treatment of cancer

Dr Sinéad O’Keeffe, UL researcher is applying sensor technology to the treatment of cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Sinéad and her team at the Optical Fibre Sensors Research Centre, UL, are developing sensors which can be applied to critical organs to ensure they are not exposed to high levels of radiation. This technology will allow us to get up close to tumours to deliver treatment in a completely innovative way. A great example of Irish sensor research playing a part in the global battle against cancer.

Blocking the onset of breast cancer

Dr Maeve Kiely is part of UL’s research team in the Laboratory of Cellular & Molecular Biology which is studying the complex interactions occurring between proteins inside cells in the hope of blocking the onset of breast cancer. Maeve is one of UL's many PhD graduates striving for excellence and making a real impact to our society. 94% of UL’s PhD graduates are employed, with the majority working in Ireland and helping to build our world-leading innovation ecosystem.

Genetic testing technology

UL research fellow, Dr Mark Dalton has collaborated with high-potential Irish start-up company, GenCell Biosystems to develop next generation genetic analysis technology. This research partnership helps to deliver technological edge to enable Irish industry compete on a global scale. The Limerick-based GenCell recently announced a major with Brazilian partners to develop new clinical screening systems to address that country's healthcare needs.

The world of crystal engineering

Professor Michael Zaworotko, Bernal Chair of Crystal Engineering at the University of Limerick has been ranked among the world’s top 1% highly cited researchers displaying exceptional impact. Only three thousand researchers earned the distinction by writing the greatest numbers of reports officially designated by Essential Science Indicators℠ asHighly Cited Papers—ranking among the top 1% most cited for their subject field and year of publication. 

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