Website launch introduces secondary school students to real world science

Jon O’Halloran, Dr Mary Shire, Dr Sarah Hayes, Senator Maria Byrne and Prof. Luuk van der Wielen

The Synthesis and Solid State Pharmaceutical Centre (SSPC) funded by Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) and based in the Bernal Institute at the University of Limerick (UL) has launched their Medicines In My Life initiative. The purpose of the initiative, which includes a website and resources for teachers and pupils, is to support the SSPC’s innovative educational programme for post-primary teachers and pupils, entitled ‘Innovation in Medicines’, a module designed to introduce students to the world of medicine.

SSPC partners with iCRAG for National Crystal Growing Competition

First place winner, Kieran Barrett from Clongowes Wood College SJ, Kildare.

The Synthesis and Solid State Pharmaceutical Centre (SSPC) with iCRAG (Irish Centre for Research in Applied Geosciences), both funded by Science Foundation Ireland (SFI), announced winners of the 2016 National Crystal Growing Competition at the national awards ceremony today.

The very successful SSPC National Crystal Growing Competition, now in its third year, has seen interest soar in schools nationally. For this reason, SSPC partnered with iCRAG to enable the acknowledgement of multiple schools achievements.

Milking Engineering Science for Dairy

Professor Harry Van den Akker, Bernal Chair in Fluid Mechanics

Ireland produces in the region of 5,400 billion litres of milk annually and about 10% of the global exports of infant milk formula.

Professor Harry Van den Akker, Bernal Chair in Fluid Mechanics, and his team at UL are developing ways to make the multi-billion-euro dairy products industry more efficient.

“Dairy plants didn’t change for decades. To some degree, and I don’t mean this negatively, it was more an art or a profession than a science. The processes, the equipment, the conditions for operating, there were not many changes in them over the years so there is room for improvement,” Professor Van den Akker stated.

Lero and Fraunhofer Centre focus on digital transformation projects

L-R Mikael Lindvall,Peter O’Neill,Brian Fitzgerald,Taoiseach Enda Kenny,Mark Ferguson,Adam Porter,Mike Hinchey,Brendan O’Malley

Washington D.C., Monday, 20th March, 2017

An Taoiseach Enda Kenny TD has announced the signing of a new agreement between Lero, the UL headquartered SFI Research Centre for Software, and the Fraunhofer Center for Experimental Software Engineering at the University of Maryland, which will see both centres of excellence engage in extensive research collaboration in the coming years. The collaboration will focus on evolving critical systems and digital transformation.

Lero wins €280,000 R&D programme to transform Limerick SME Kelmac into global internet player

Gerard Kelly, CEO, Kelmac Group, Limerick with Dr. Noel Carroll, Research Fellow at Lero, the Irish Software Research Centre

Limerick SME Kelmac Group collaborates with Lero on a €280,000 R&D programme to transform it into global internet player. Kelmac Group® to double workforce and open international R&D technology centre at Plassey Technological Park, Limerick

New head of Lero, the Irish Software Research Centre announced

Professor Brian Fitzgerald has been appointed director of Lero, the Irish Software Research Centre which is headquartered at the University of Limerick (UL). He replaces Professor Mike Hinchey following an eight year term of office.

Roscommon born Professor Fitzgerald was formerly chief scientist at Lero and has been involved with the Science Foundation Ireland supported national research centre since its inception in 2005, apart from a spell as vice-president research at UL from 2008-2011.

Bridging the Software Architectural Gap

Researchers

  • Dr. Jim Buckley (Lero)
  • Dr. Jacek Rosik (Lero)

Software applications are becoming increasingly large and complex. For example, some (dated) reports of Mac Office state that it contains 30,000,000 lines of code. Windows XP was reported as consisting  of 45,000,000! Considering that there are 40 lines of text on an average book-page, that means that Mac Office is a 750,000 page epic while XP comes in at a block-busting 1,125,000 pages.

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