Bioethanol from microalgae - DEMA

Biofuels have the potential to significantly reduce the output of carbon caused by transport, and reduce the impact of transport on climate change. DEMA is a University of Limerick-led project focused on microalgae found in oceans, lakes and damp soil, and on rocks, where energy is extracted via photosynthesis to produce biofuels. DEMA is focused on the development, demonstration and licensing of a complete, economically competitive technology from the direct production of bioethanol from microalgae by 2016.

Researchers Squeeze Low-Cost Electricity From Biomaterial

Sarah Guerin a post-graduate student at the Department of Physics and the Bernal Institute, UL

Scientists at UL’s Bernal Institute have discovered that the biomolecule glycine, when tapped or squeezed, can generate enough electricity to power electrical devices in an economically viable and environmentally sustainable way. The research was published on December 4, 2017 in leading international journal Nature Materials.

New water filtration process uses 1,000 times less energy

A new process for water filtration using carbon dioxide consumes one thousand times less energy than conventional methods, scientific research published this week has shown.

The research was co-led by University of Limerick’s Dr Orest Shardt together with Dr Sangwoo Shin (now at University of Hawaii, Manoa), while they were both post doctoral researchers at Princeton University last year.

MACSI and ESRI research shows that electricity users, not investors, are exposed to price fluctuations

A study by Mel Devine and Niall Farrell of the Economic and Social Research Institute and William T Lee of the universities of Portsmouth and Limerick, says the system means that electricity users, rather than those investing in renewable energy, are the ones exposed to price fluctuations.

The system means that renewable energy producers are compensated when the wholesale price of electricity falls below the tariff guaranteed to them under the Refit scheme.

Homes and businesses pay for this through the public service charge, which increases as the wholesale price falls, while those who invest in renewable power face no risk from movements in the wholesale price.

MOF Technologies to collaborate with UL researchers to develop technologies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

MOF Technologies will collaborate with University of Limerick to develop Two New Metal Organic Frameworks with outstanding Gas Capture and Storage Capabilities

MOF Technologies has agreed to develop for commercialisation two MOFs from the University of Limerick (UL) designed to be highly selective for carbon capture and storage.

In response to an EU-led initiative to reduce greenhouse gas emissions across European member states, researchers at the University of Limerick (UL) have developed a new class of Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) which have proven to be highly effective for carbon capture and storage.

Minister Announces UL Researcher as Winner of SFI Research Image of the Year Competition

Lightning Wires by Matthew Gleeson

Minister for Skills, Research and Innovation Damien English TD, recently announced Matthew Gleeson, postgraduate researcher at UL, as the winner of Science Foundation Ireland’s Research Image of the Year competition for his picture ‘Lightning Wires’ at the SFI Science Summit in Kilkenny. The winning image was selected from over 40 submissions and will appear on the front of the 2015 SFI Annual Report.

DIBANET - an integrated approach to biomass development

Dr Daniel Hayes

Biofuels are an important alternative to fossil fuels that can minimise the impact of energy production on global climate change. DIBANET is an Irish-led research project aimed at developing an integrated approach to biomass development that further enhances international cooperation between the EU and Latin America in the field of biofuels. This project aims at developing technologies to sustainably exploit biomass for the profitable production of biofuels and other valuable chemicals. The project supports the development of technologies with a view to reducing dependency on fossil diesel imports in Latin America and Europe.

DIBANET - an integrated approach to biomass development

Biofuels are an important alternative to fossil fuels that can minimise the impact of energy production on global climate change. DIBANET is an Irish-led research project aimed at developing an integrated approach to biomass development that further enhances international cooperation between the EU and Latin America in the field of biofuels. This project aims at developing technologies to sustainably exploit biomass for the profitable production of biofuels and other valuable chemicals.

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