Lero chief is first Irish president of Association for Information Systems

Professor Brian Fitzgerald, director of Lero, the Irish Software Research Centre, has been elected president of the international Association for Information Systems (AIS). He is the first Irish person to be elected to the role and will serve a three-year term.

Headquartered in Atlanta, USA, the AIS is a global professional association for individuals and organisations who lead the research, teaching, practice and study of information systems worldwide. It comprises almost 5,000 members globally and runs four international conferences annually.

UL ranks 35th globally in first ever Times Higher Education University Impact Rankings

THE University of Limerick has ranked 35th globally in the first ever Times Higher Education University Impact Rankings and first in Ireland for gender equality.

The unique ranking is designed to measure the impact of an academic institution on society, based on the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.

UL is ranked 35th overall in the 2019 list, published this Wednesday by Times Higher Education (THE), which is the data provider underpinning university excellence in every continent across the world.

Record turnout for 6th Annual AICUR (All Ireland Conference for Undergraduate Research)

This year’s All Ireland Conference for Undergraduate Research (AICUR) had its highest numbers of undergraduate research participants to date, and took place in the Kemmy Business School, UL on 28th March, 2019.

The keynote speech for the 6th annual event was delivered by Seamus Hickey. Seamus was part of the 2018 Limerick All-Ireland winning senior hurling team, is Chair of the Gaelic Players Association (GPA), and is a UL alumnus. Seamus successfully defended his PhD thesis from UL in 2018 and works as the Research Projects Coordinator for Johnson & Johnson.

Irish universities contribute €8.89 billion to national economy every year

THE Irish economy benefitted by €8.9 billion last year from Ireland’s seven universities newly published research has confirmed.

The first ever socio-economic impact research undertaken on the role universities play in the economy and society has been carried out by Indecon Research Economists who were appointed by the Irish Universities Association, following a competitive tender process, to cover the combined impact of the seven universities represented by the IUA – University of Limerick, Dublin City University, Maynooth University, NUI Galway, Trinity College Dublin, University College Cork, University College Dublin.

Classic arcade game Pac-Man provides insights into human behaviour: UL study

Dr Jason Power

A UNIQUE study by a lecturer at the University of Limerick has revealed that classic arcade game Pac-Man can provide insights into human behaviour and psychology.

The research by Dr Jason Power, a lecturer at UL’s School of Education, examined the impact of a person’s belief about their own capabilities and how this influences their performance by using the classic 1980s video game to look at daily behaviour.

Dr Power explains: “Pac-Man’s difficulty slowly ramps up to allow even the most casual players to experience success. This builds a person’s belief that they can succeed and encourages them to try again.”

Second level students invited to create an experiment for testing in microgravity

Irish second level students are in with a chance to develop a science experiment for testing on a microgravity flight this October to help address the issue of sustaining life beyond this planet.

Project PoSSUM (Polar Suborbital Science in the Upper Mesosphere) will fly a number of microgravity flights in Ottawa, Canada at the National Research Council and thanks to a unique partnership with The Irish Composites Centre (IComp) at University of Limerick, Irish students will be part of those flights.

Bernal researcher, Dr Sarah Guerin selected to attend the 69th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

Once every year, more than 30 Nobel Laureates convene in Lindau to meet the next generation of leading scientists.

The 69th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting (#LINO19) takes place on  June 30 – July 5th   and will be dedicated to physics,  key topics are cosmology, laser physics and gravitational waves.

The opportunity to join the annual gathering of Nobel Laureates at Lindau is provided exclusively to outstanding young scientists aged up to 35 – undergraduates, PhD students, and post-doc researchers. In order to participate in a meeting, they have to pass a multi-step application and selection process.

Second level students invited to create an experiment for testing in microgravity

Irish second level students are in with a chance to develop a science experiment for testing on a microgravity flight this October to help address the issue of sustaining life beyond this planet.

Project PoSSUM (Polar Suborbital Science in the Upper Mesosphere) will fly a number of microgravity flights in Ottawa, Canada at the National Research Council and thanks to a unique partnership with The Irish Composites Centre (IComp) at University of Limerick, Irish students will be part of those flights.

Dr Fergal Lynch, Secretary General of the Department of Children and Youth Affairs, visits UL

L-R Back Tony O’Donovan, Kerstin Mey, Fergal Lynch, Sean Redmond L-R Front Mary Shire, Michelle Shannon, Conor Rowley, Shane Kilcommins

The University of Limerick was pleased to welcome Dr Fergal Lynch, Secretary General of the Department of Children and Youth Affairs today to discuss the progress of the REPPP project located in the School of Law, Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. Dr Lynch was accompanied by Assistant Secretary Michelle Shannon and Principal Officers Tony O’Donovan and Conor Rowley.

Commenting on the Research Evidence into Policy, Programmes and Practice (REPPP) project, Dr Lynch said

New research collaboration between UL and Department of Children and Youth Affairs to design better ways of dealing with ‘Wicked Problems’

Conor Rowley & Prof Sean Redmond

Wicked problems are problems which are resistant to change, which morph over time and turn would-be ideal solutions into worse problems that persist; examples are no-go zones in urban areas, serious drug related activity and lack of pro-social leadership in communities devastated by routine criminal activity. Large scale evidence based programmes tip away at the edge of wicked problems, which severely expose the state, they do not fit into the administrative remit of one state agency or the other. Most significant of all wicked problems tend to be context specific.

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