Homepage Slider

Cranfield Network ('Cranet') Project on International Human Resource Management

Directors: Michael Morley, Paddy Gunnigle and Tom Turner.

The Cranfield-University of Limerick (CUL) Study of Human Resource Management (HRM) in Ireland forms part of the Cranfield Network (Cranet) Survey on International HRM, first established in 1989. The Irish node of this study is located at the Employment Relations Research Unit, University of Limerick and directed by Michael Morley, Patrick Gunnigle and Tom Turner. This study forms the basis for the most authoritative analysis of HRM practice involving, in the latest phase (1999-2000), some 8000 organisations in over thirty countries. To-date three phases of the CUL survey have been conducted in Ireland, in 1992/93, 1995/96 and 1999/2000. For review of the 1992/93 study, together with additional case study material, see Gunnigle, P., Flood, P., Morley, M. & Turner, T. (1994), Continuity and Change in Irish Employee Relations, Dublin: Oak Tree Press, and Turner, T. & Morley, M. (1995) Industrial Relations and the New Order, Dublin: Oak Tree Press.  For the 1995/96 study see Gunnigle, P., Morley, M., Clifford, N. & Turner, T. (1997), Human Resource Management in Irish Organisations: Practice in Perspective, Dublin: Oak Tree Press. Information from the 2000/2001 study is available from the Employment Relations Research Unit, University of Limerick.
 
Indicative publications
 
Atterbury, S., Brewster, C., Cross, C., Communal, C., Gunnigle, P., & Morley, M. (2004), “The United Kingdom and Ireland: Facing the Atlantic or Facing Europe?”, in Brewster, C., Mayrhofer, W. & Morley, M. (Eds.) European Human Resource Management: Signs of Convergence?, Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann.

Morley, M., Brewster, C., Gunnigle, P., & Mayrhofer, W. 2000. Evaluating change in European industrial relations: Research evidence on trends at organisational level”, in Brewster, C., Mayrhofer, W. & Morley, M. (Eds.), New Challenges for European Human Resource Management, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Macmillan.