Seminar: Life in the Nineteenth-Century Irish Female Convict Prison

Seminar: Life in the Nineteenth-Century Irish Female Convict Prison

Centre for Historical Research Research Seminar Series Spring 2015

Forthcoming Seminar: Dr Elaine Farrell (Queen’s University Belfast)
  ‘It is quiet; hardly a murmur within its walls’: Life in the Nineteenth-Century Irish Female Convict Prison

Date: Wednesday, 11th February, 5.15 p.m.

Venue:  The Board Room, Glucksman Library, UL

Dr Elaine Farrell is Lecturer in Irish Economic and Social History in Queen’s University Belfast. Dr Farrell’s PhD research examined the crime of infanticide in Ireland from 1850-1900. This led to the publication of a number of works including ‘A most diabolical deed’: Infanticide and Irish Society, 1850-1900 (Manchester University Press, 2013) and Infanticide in the Irish Crown Files at Assizes (Irish Manuscripts Commission, 2012). Dr Farrell’s current research project focuses on criminal women in nineteenth-century Ireland. This work interrogates gendered notions of femininity evident in the nineteenth-century Irish courts and penal system, and assesses experiences for convict women. 

ALL WELCOME
For further information contact Dr Richard Kirwan (richard.kirwan@ul.ie).