Religious Spaces in Transition: Symposium

Religious Spaces in Transition: Symposium

Religious Spaces in Transition: Symposium
16 January 2020
Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick.
 
Between 1830 and 1930, Irish urban and rural landscapes were transformed through the building and development activities of the Roman Catholic church. Many of the buildings constructed during this period are still actively used, while others are currently undergoing changes of use, or are falling into ruin. These include schools, convents, churches, recreational spaces and monasteries. This poses a challenge for the communities associated with these buildings, as well as for architectural historians, urban planners and heritage managers.
 
This conference will bring together researchers, heritage professionals, and architects who work with the buildings produced by the Roman Catholic church in Ireland between 1830 and 1930. It will also bring together those who continue to use the buildings as active spaces of worship, and those who use the buildings in new ways. The aim of this symposium is to share current research and practice, and to begin to collaboratively map a research agenda for this area going forward.
 
The keynote address will be given by Dr Sarah Roddy from Manchester University, and speakers include Dr Richard Butler (University of Leicester), Dr Gillian O'Brien (Liverpool John Moores University), Jessie Castle (Historic Buildings Consultant), Dr Danielle O'Donovan (Nano Nagle Place), Professor John McCafferty (University College Dublin), and Dr Joseph MacMahon, OFM. Panel chairs will include Dr Patrick Doyle (Manchester University) and Dr Caroline McGee (Trinity College Dublin).
 
The symposium will include a site visit to the John Henry Newman Campus, part of Mary Immaculate College of Education in Limerick.
 
This event is free, but booking is essential in order to facilitate catering and transport. Tickets can be booked via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/religious-spaces-in-transition-symposium-tic...
 
This project has been funded under Strand 2 (Knowledge Exchange for Impact) of the New Foundations Scheme by the Irish Research Council. The support of the Irish Research Council is gratefully acknowledged.