Lecture: Dictatorships, Detectives and Universal Justice in World Crime Fiction

Lecture: Dictatorships, Detectives and Universal Justice in World Crime Fiction

Public Lecture: Dr Stewart King (Monash University, Australia)
 
Dictatorships, Detectives and Universal Justice in World Crime Fiction
 
Tuesday 19th Nov, 5-6 in LC0017
 
In some ways the spectacular success of world literature as a category of analysis over the past 15 years can be attributed to the exciting new relationships that are forged by bringing together texts from across a range of previously considered discrete national, cultural and linguistic contexts. This talk establishes a transnational relationship between a number of historical crime novels set during periods of military rule and dictatorship in Italy, Spain, Argentina and Japan in the works of Maurizio de Giovanni, Agustí Vehí, Eduardo Sacheri and Jung-Myung Lee.
 
Rather than exploring these novels within the exclusive national context in which they were produced, and thereby reinforcing national distinctiveness as an interpretative framework, I propose that when we read these novels outside their national tradition, we can see the emergence of a shared, international concept of justice that provides the ideological framework in which issues like justice, moral agency, victimhood and culpability within the specific dictatorial regimes can be understood. In “worlding” these novels, we are able to recognise the profound connections between the local and the global that allows for the emergence of a global consciousness. 
 
 
Stewart King is Senior Lecturer in Spanish and Catalan Studies and teaches international literatures at Monash University, Australia. He has published extensively on Spanish and Catalan crime narratives and on crime fiction as a form of world literature. He is the author of Escribir la catalanidad (Tamesis, 2005) and Murder in the Multinational State: Crime Fiction from Spain (Routledge, 2019). His current work on crime fiction includes the co-edited volumes Criminal Moves. Modes of Mobility in Crime Fiction (Liverpool University Press, 2019), The Routledge Companion to Crime Fiction (forthcoming 2020) and The Cambridge Companion to World Crime Fiction (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2021).
 
 
The event is supported by the International Crime Genre Research Group and part of module CU4127, Comparative Literature: Crime Fiction as Critical Memory. Everybody is welcome to attend.