UL Researchers Undertake Study to Evaluate Impact of Psychology Based Treatments for Drugs Users

UL Researchers Undertake Study to Evaluate Impact of Psychology Based Treatments for Drugs Users

UL researchers have been awarded €300,000 by Ireland’s Health Research Board to develop and evaluate psychosocial interventions for drug and alcohol users in primary care. Psychosocial interventions are described as aimed at reducing consumption behaviour or alcohol-related problems by using psychological approaches
 
Principal Investigator and Professor of General Practice at UL, Walter Cullen, explains: “The focus of this study is to evaluate the impact of psychology based treatments as opposed to the approach of medicating patients dealing with drug and alcohol addiction. There is a significant knowledge gap in this area internationally and we hope this study will help practitioners in Ireland assist their patients to deal with this issue.”
 
Led by Dr Jan Klimas Post-doctoral Researcher at the Centre for Interventions in Inflammation, Infection & Immunity (4i) (http://www.4i.ie) hosted by University of Limerick’s Graduate Entry Medical School, the study involves collaborators from a wide range of disciplines and agencies as well as international experts from the UK, USA and Australia.
 
The study, entitled ‘‘Are Psychosocial Interventions Effective for Problem Alcohol Use among Problem Drug Users’ (the PINTA study) will involve over 20 practices in the Midwest and Eastern regions.
 
The Centre for Interventions in Infection, Inflammation & Immunity (4i), Graduate Entry Medical School, UL brings together a multidisciplinary team of researchers focused on developing studies that impact health outcomes.
 
Director of the Centre, Professor Colum Dunne, complimented the team that successfully competed for this funding, adding “this study builds on previous work, also funded by the HRB, that qualitatively explored patients’ and practitioners’ experiences of problem drug and alcohol use. In a recent Cochrane review we identified gaps in the currently available scientific evidence relating to effectiveness treatments for problem alcohol use. This new study will add considerably to that field of practice.”
 
The Cochrane Review can be viewed here.